• Pfister, D. (Photographer). (2008) Fistulina after harvest  [photograph]. Punta Arenas, Chile.

    Pfister, D. (Photographer). (2008) Fistulina after harvest [photograph]. Punta Arenas, Chile.

  • Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Laetiporus sulphureus – Chicken of the woods. [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

    Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Laetiporus sulphureus – Chicken of the woods. [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

  • Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Trichaptum biforme [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

    Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Trichaptum biforme [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

  • Pfister, D. (Photographer). (2008) Peziza, a cup fungus [photograph]. Punta Arenas, Chile.

    Pfister, D. (Photographer). (2008) Peziza, a cup fungus [photograph]. Punta Arenas, Chile.

  • Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Gloeoporus-dichrousl [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

    Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Gloeoporus-dichrousl [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

  • Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Mycena sp. [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

    Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Mycena sp. [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

  • Pfister, D. (Photographer). (2008) Cyttaria, a fungal parasite of Nothofagus [photograph]. Punta Arenas, Chile.

    Pfister, D. (Photographer). (2008) Cyttaria, a fungal parasite of Nothofagus [photograph]. Punta Arenas, Chile.

  • Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Polyporus alveolaris [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

    Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Polyporus alveolaris [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

  • Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Schizophyllum commune – Split Gill [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

    Haelwaters, D. (Photographer). (2013). Schizophyllum commune – Split Gill [photograph]. Hingham, MA: Worlds End.

Recent Publications

On the co-occurrence of species of Wynnea (Ascomycota, Pezizales, Sarcoscyphaceae) andArmillaria (Basidiomycota, Agaricales, Physalacriaceae)

Xu, F., LoBuglio, K.F. & Pfister, D.H., 2019. On the co-occurrence of species of Wynnea (Ascomycota, Pezizales, Sarcoscyphaceae) andArmillaria (Basidiomycota, Agaricales, Physalacriaceae). Fungal Systematics and Evolution , 4 , pp. 1-12.Abstract

Abstract: Species of the genus Wynnea are collected in association with a subterranean mass generally referred to as a sclerotium.

This is one of the few genera of the Sarcoscyphaceae not associated with plant material – wood or leaves. The sclerotium is

composed of hyphae of both Armillaria species and Wynnea species. To verify the existence of Armillaria species in the sclerotia of

those Wynnea species not previously examined and to fully understand the structure and nature of the sclerotium, molecular data

and morphological characters were analyzed. Using nuclear ITS rDNA sequences the Armillaria species co-occurring with Wynnea

species were identified from all examined material. These Armillaria symbionts fall into two main Armillaria groups – the A. gallicanabsnona-

calvescens group and the A. mellea group. Divergent time estimates of the Armillaria and Wynnea lineages support a

co-evolutionary relationship between these two fungi.

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Systematic study of truffles in the genusRuhlandiella , with the description of two new species from Patagonia

Kraisitudomsook, N., et al., 2019. Systematic study of truffles in the genusRuhlandiella , with the description of two new species from Patagonia. Mycologia.Abstract
Ruhlandiella is a genus of exothecial, ectomycorrhizal fungi in the order Pezizales. Ascomata of exothecial fungi typically lack a peridium and are covered with a hymenial layer instead. Ruhlandiella species have nonoperculate asci and highly ornamented ascospores. The genus was first described by Hennings in 1903 to include the single species, R. berolinensis. Since then, mycologists have uncovered Ruhlandiella species in many locations around the globe, including Australia, Spain, Italy, and the USA. Currently, there are four recognized species: R. berolinensis, R. peregrina, R. reticulata, and R. truncata. All were found near Eucalyptus or Melaleuca trees of Australasian origin. Recently, we discovered two new species of Ruhlandiella in Nothofagaceae forests in South America. They regularly form mitotic spore mats directly on soil in the forests of Patagonia. Here, we formally describe these new species and construct the phylogeny of Ruhlandiella and related genera using a multilocus phylogenetic analysis. We also revise the taxonomy of Ruhlandiella and provide an identification key to accepted species of Ruhlandiella.
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Birth of an order: Comprehensive molecular phylogenetic study excludes Herpomyces (Fungi, Labouleniomycetes) from Laboulbeniales

Haelewaters, D., et al., 2019. Birth of an order: Comprehensive molecular phylogenetic study excludes Herpomyces (Fungi, Labouleniomycetes) from Laboulbeniales. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution , 133 , pp. 286-301.Abstract
The class Laboulbeniomycetes comprises biotrophic parasites associated with arthropods and fungi. Two orders are currently recognized, Pyxidiophorales and Laboulbeniales. Herpomyces is an isolated genus of Laboulbeniales, with species that exclusively parasitize cockroaches (Blattodea). Here, we evaluate 39 taxa of Laboulbeniomycetes with a three-locus phylogeny (nrSSU, ITS, nrLSU) and propose a new order in this class. Herpomycetales accommodates a single genus, Herpomyces, with currently 26 species, one of which is described here based on morphological and molecular data. Herpomyces shelfordellae is found on Shelfordella lateralis cockroaches from Hungary, Poland, and the USA. We also build on the six-locus dataset from the Ascomycota Tree of Life paper (Schoch and colleagues, 2009) to confirm that Laboulbeniomycetes and Sordariomycetes are sister classes, and we apply laboulbeniomyceta as a rankless taxon for the now well-resolved node that describes the most recent common ancestor of both classes.
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Morphological species of Gloeandromyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniales) evaluated using single-locus species delimitation methods

Haelewaters, D. & Pfister, D.H., 2019. Morphological species of Gloeandromyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniales) evaluated using single-locus species delimitation methods. Fungal Systematics and Evolution , 3 , pp. 19-33.Abstract
In this paper, new species and formae of the genus Gloeandromyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniales) are described and illustrated. These are: Gloeandromyces dickii sp. nov. on Trichobius joblingi from Nicaragua and Panama; G. pageanus f. alarum f. nov. on Tri. joblingi from Panama; G. pageanus f. polymorphus f. nov. on Tri. dugesioides and Tri. joblingi from Panama and Trinidad; and G. streblae f. sigmomorphus f. nov. on Tri. joblingi from Panama. Gloeandromyces pageanus on Tri. dugesioides from Panama as described in Nova Hedwigia 105 (2017) is referred to as G. pageanus f. pageanus. Support for these descriptions of species and formae comes from phylogenetic reconstruction of the large subunit ribosomal DNA and from the application of species delimitation methods (ABGD, bPTP, GMYC). Host specialization results in phylogenetic segregation by host species in both G. pageanus and G. streblae and this may represent a case of incipient speciation. A second mechanism driving diversity involves position induced morphological adaptations, leading to the peculiar morphotypes that are associated to growing on a particular position of the integument (G. pageanus f. alarum, G. streblae f. sigmomorphus).
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A novel proof of concept for capturing the diversity of endophytic fungi preserved in herbarium specimens

Daru, B.H., et al., 2019. A novel proof of concept for capturing the diversity of endophytic fungi preserved in herbarium specimens. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B , 374 (1763) , pp. 20170395.Abstract
Herbarium specimens represent important records of morphological and genetic diversity of plants that inform questions relevant to global change, including species distributions, phenology and functional traits. It is increasingly appreciated that plant microbiomes can influence these aspects of plant biology, but little is known regarding the historic distribution of microbes associated with plants collected in the pre-molecular age. If microbiomes can be observed reliably in herbarium specimens, researchers will gain a new lens with which to examine microbial ecology, evolution, species interactions. Here, we describe a method for accessing historical plant microbiomes from preserved herbarium specimens, providing a proof of concept using two plant taxa from the imperiled boreal biome (Andromeda polifolia and Ledum palustre subsp. groenlandicum, Ericaceae). We focus on fungal endophytes, which occur within symptomless plant tissues such as leaves. Through a three-part approach (i.e. culturing, cloning and next-generation amplicon sequencing via the Illumina MiSeq platform, with extensive controls), we examined endophyte communities in dried, pressed leaves that had been processed as regular herbarium specimens and stored at room temperature in a herbarium for four years. We retrieved only one endophyte in culture, but cloning and especially the MiSeq analysis revealed a rich community of foliar endophytes. The phylogenetic distribution and diversity of endophyte assemblages, especially among the Ascomycota, resemble endophyte communities from fresh plants collected in the boreal biome. We could distinguish communities of endophytes in each plant species and differentiate likely endophytes from fungi that could be surface contaminants. Taxa found by cloning were observed in the larger MiSeq dataset, but species richness was greater when subsets of the same tissues were evaluated with the MiSeq approach. Our findings provide a proof of concept for capturing endophyte DNA from herbarium specimens, supporting the importance of herbarium records as roadmaps for understanding the dynamics of plant-associated microbial biodiversity in the Anthropocene.This article is part of the theme issue 'Biological collections for understanding biodiversity in the Anthropocene'.
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